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posts for december 2015.

in the last 30 days, a lot of things happened. the worst thing happening was that one of our cats, töffel, lost more and more strength and started looking really miserable. since in the weeks before we already had to give him infusions as he was drinking way too little, and he hated that pretty much, we decided not to start more medicine experiments and instead to stop his suffering by putting him to sleep. he’s probably better off now.

rest in peace, töffel!

posted in: feelings
places: hinwil

three days ago, let’s encrypt started their public beta. for those of you who don’t know: let’s encrypt is a certificate authority issuing free certificates for protecting https connections.

this is awesome!

for one, this allows me to get some “real” certificates (as opposed to my self-signed ones) without paying a larger sum of money per year (i’m using quite many subdomains of and two other domains, which results in quite some sum even when using cheap resellers of resellers of resellers).

then, their goal is to automate the whole process as much as possible. so instead of a lof of manual work (mostly filling out forms, handling payment of fees, reacting to emails or domain challenge requests, etc.) it should be possible to run one command, maybe even as a cronjob, to get a (renewed) certificate for a domain or a set of domains.

on thursday, when the beta officially started, i tried out the official client. as mentioned already by lots of others, it has some serious downside: it is a huge python program which needs to be run as root. (not necessarily on the webserver, though, even though in that case you cannot automate stuff anymore.) but there were already alternatives: a static website telling you what to do and doing some calculations in javascript, or a tiny python client. (both are by daniel roesler.)

that’s already much better, but still not what i want, as this is hard to automate when you don’t want to run that on the webserver itself. i’m prefering something which can run somewhere else, and can be integrated in an orchestration tool like ansible. well, so i took daniel roesler’s code (including a python 3 patch by collin anderson) and converted it into a more modular tool, which allows to split up the process so that with some more scripting, it can easily be used to do the process from remote. you can find the result on github. i also created an ansible role which allows to simply generate keys, certificate signing requests and get complete certificates from let’s encrypt with ansible; that project can also be found on github. i’m using it in production for my personal webserver: as a result you can now look at spielwiese without having to accept my self-signed certificate! maybe also others will find this useful.